Non-Canadian Travel Destinations That Every Canadian Should Visit

Canada is home to some of the most beautiful bits of scenery and many of the world’s cleanest cities. While we encourage everyone to visit Canada at some point in their life, where are the Canadians supposed to go? To answer that question, we’ve compiled a list of non-Canadian travel destinations that every Canadian should visit – destinations that are rich in Canadian history or simply of the same feather.

Vimy Ridge War Memorial

Vimy Ridge War Memorial


1. Canadian National Vimy Memorial
Located on a 250-acre plot of land in Vimy, France, the Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a historical monument in remembrance of the many Canadian soldiers that died in France during World War I. Additionally, the fixture stands to acknowledge those that are presumed to have died but never given a proper grave.

There is an inscription that reads:
“To the valour of their countrymen in the Great War and in memory of their sixty thousand dead this monument is raised by the people of Canada.”

For any Canadian interested in paying homage to the brave men that fought and died for their country during the early 1900s, this French memorial is a must see.

Mmmm Poutine!

Mmm Poutine!


2. Pommes Frites NYC
On a much more light-hearted note, there is a Belgian shop/restaurant in New York City that serves a variety of Belgian fries called Pommes Frites – an unparalleled international treat. Because Canadians choose flights to New York City more than any other US city on the map, and because they serve a Canadian Poutine topped with cheddar cheese and a chicken gravy that’s like nothing you’ve ever experienced before, this is a no-brainer visit for those seeking a Canadian experience, outside of Canada.
Dieppe, France

Dieppe, France


3. Dieppe, France
In addition to being a bustling port city in France with an extreme charm, Dieppe is more notoriously known for the Dieppe Raid during World War II (1942) that resulted in the death and/or wounding of 3,367 Canadian soldiers as they stormed the German-occupied beach of Dieppe. In remembrance of the fallen and because Dieppe was later liberated by the 2nd Canadian Infantry Division, there are many Canadian flags unfurled all across the city and Canuck Pride is thick.
Portland, OR

Portland, OR

4. Portland, OR
If you’re a Canadian looking to take a vacation, but don’t want to venture too far from your comfort zone, it is said that Portland, OR is the most Canada-like city in the entire US. Not only is it located just hours from the Canadian border, but the overall culture, scenery and city planning of Portland will make you feel like you’re still in the heart of Vancouver, BC (or any other Canadian metropolitan area).

Although there isn’t as much Canadian history to be experienced in Portland as some of the other entries above, every Canadian should visit nonetheless, just to see if the likeness claims are true.

Beny-sur-Mer War Cemetery

Beny-sur-Mer War Cemetery


5. Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery
Another of the war memorial sites inspired by World War II bravery, the Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery in Reviers, France is the resting place of 2,044 Canadian soldiers that were killed in the beach invasions surrounding D-Day. Best known as a place of reflection and remembrance, any Canadian would be taken back by the serene site and proud of their fallen forefathers.
Welcome to the Thunderdome

Welcome to the Thunderdome

6. The Thunderdome
It’s no secret that hockey is appreciated on a whole different level in Canada than it is the US – ingrained since youth; ice hockey is the Canadian national pastime. That said, when it comes to non-Canadian places to see, every Canadian would appreciate The Thunderdome in St Petersburg, FL. Home of the Tampa Bay Lightning and 28,183 seats, it is the largest ice hockey arena in the world!

Juno Beach D-Day Memorial

Juno Beach D-Day Memorial


7. Juno Beach Centre
Although the Juno Beach Centre in the Calvados region of Normandy is a museum that was erected near the same beach where 14,000 Canadian troops landed on D-Day in 1944 (codename Juno), it is more than just a war memorial. In addition to archiving the D-Day saga and the sacrifices made my Canadian troops on that day, the museum prides itself on also telling the story of life in Canada before the war and the Canadian civilian contributions made toward the war effort.

The entire centre is a great way for Canadians to learn, not only about the sacrifices made by Canadian troops, but also the sacrifices made by the Canadian citizens that ultimately spurred their troops to victory.

Cuba

Cuba


8. Cuba
Last on the list is Cuba – a country that most likely has no monuments for Canadian history, no likeness to the Canadian landscape and most likely serves nothing remotely close to Canadian cuisine, however, we recommend every Canadian take a trip to Cuba, simply because you can. Yes, while you’ll be missing out on some basic history lessons, every Canadian will surely like Cuba because it’s warm, it’s an exotic place to vacation on the cheap and best of all, no Americans.