How long Canadian Citizens stay in States WITHOUT a Visa?

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princess_memaiiNew Member
Topic author
Posts: 2
Joined: 5 Sep 2007
Location: Winnipeg

How long Canadian Citizens stay in States WITHOUT a Visa?

Post Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:15 am

Hi I'm a 25 years old Canadian Citizen, and I'd like to know how long can I stay in the States WITHOUT a Visa?
nivshaNew Member
Posts: 7
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Location: Canada

Post Wed Sep 05, 2007 1:52 pm

Hey,
You can stay in the States for up to 6 months per calendar year.
princess_memaiiNew Member
Topic author
Posts: 2
Joined: 5 Sep 2007
Location: Winnipeg

Post Wed Sep 05, 2007 9:27 pm

Hello again,

So I don't need to apply for any Visas, if I stay in the States within 90 days? I'm just worried I might get pulled aside and get questioned for staying long without a Visa. I really want to find more information before booking my flights to stay on the safe side. I hope to hear from you again and thanks for your reply.
nivshaNew Member
Posts: 7
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Location: Canada

Post Thu Sep 06, 2007 12:25 am

No one will pull you aside unless you are lieing or you have a criminal record or DUI etc. We're free to stay in the stays for a "visit" up to 6 months per calendar year. You should go to the government of Canada website or call these numbers:

US entry requirements (Canadian source for info) call
1-800-267-6788 (9-5 eastern time)
nivshaNew Member
Posts: 7
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Location: Canada

Post Thu Sep 06, 2007 12:26 am

You only need a visa if you wanna work and earn money in the states. But if you wanna shop till you drop or just visit friends and check out the place or be a "snow bird" and escape the Canadian winter, you can be their guest.
Reba

Post Thu Sep 06, 2007 3:57 am

Its actually 6 months per calendar year, or per visit, whichever comes first. ie: if you arrive in November, you can stay til April and that's your allowed 6 months.

They will definitely ask you how you intend to finance your extended stay, and if you've got only $5 in your pocket, they'll turn your butt around and send you home. But if you've got a bit of cash on you, and take a bank statement along to show you've got accessible funds, you should be ok. That is, if they even bother pull you over into secondary questioning.
canadiangirlforeverJunior Member
Posts: 19
Joined: 6 Oct 2007
Location: Canada

Post Sat Oct 06, 2007 6:05 pm

The burden of proof is always on the applicant. There is no set period of time Canadians must wait to re-enter the U.S. after the end of their stay, but if it appears to the CBP officer that the person applying for entry is spending more time over-all in the U.S. than in Canada, it will be up to the traveler to prove to the officer that they are not de-facto U.S. residents. One of the ways to do this is demonstrate significant ties to their home country, including proof of employment, residency, etc.

So it's not per calender year it's per visit! This is taken from the cbp goverment site!
Reba

Post Sun Oct 07, 2007 6:30 am

That's what I said. Per calendar year, OR per visit, whichever comes first.

If you arrive in January, you can stay til June, but if you arrive in November, you can stay til May. And, if you stay from Nov. til May, and try to go back again in July, they will likely deny you entry.
canadiangirlforeverJunior Member
Posts: 19
Joined: 6 Oct 2007
Location: Canada

Post Sun Oct 07, 2007 9:20 pm

Reba that made no sense at all to me UGH (gave me a headache trying to figure that out) :O) anyways, i stayed this year(2007)for a total of 7 and a half months in 2 trips. ](*,) when do u suggest i try to enter again?
StevenCanuckAbroad VIP
Posts: 3699
Topics: 6
Joined: 28 Sep 2007
Location: Calgary

Post Wed Oct 10, 2007 10:14 am

The thing with this whole 183-day rule is that I had loads of Canadian neighbours when I lived in Florida, and they all stayed way longer per year than that. They'd go back for a few days and then re-enter. There was even a story on NBC news about retirees in BC all buying places in Washington the other night.

Under State law you usually have 30 or 60 days to get a DL. I suppose if you're a "seasonal" resident you don't qualify but it sounds idiotically complicated to me. I'm sure from talking to my neighbours that they were resident in Florida for tax purposes.

Anyway I suppose when I retire I'll find out because I'm not putting up with this weather when I'm an old geezer!

The real key point though is that if you maintain your Canadian DL or an address, the CRA consider you to be resident for tax purposes, and that is the real problem. You can't just buy a condo in BC, have a house in the US, spend most of your time in the US and just pay tax there.
Steve.

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