About Atlantic Ocean Road

The Atlantic Ocean Road or the Atlantic Road is a 8.3-kilometer (5.2 mi) long section of County Road 64 which runs through an archipelago in Eide and Averøy in Møre og Romsdal, Norway. The fixed link passes by Hustadvika, an unsheltered part of the Norwegian Sea, connecting the island of Averøy with the mainland and Romsdalshalvøya peninsula. The road runs between the villages of Kårvåg on Averøy and Vevang in Eida. The road is built on several small islands and skerries, which are connected by several causeways, viaducts and eight bridges—the most prominent being Storseisundet Bridge.

 

Atlantic Ocean Road Route

The Atlantic Ocean Road is a 8.274-kilometer (5.141 mi) long section of County Road 64 which connects the island and municipality of Averøy with the mainland at Eide. The road runs across an archipelago of partially inhabited islands and skerries. To the north lies Hustadvika, an unsheltered section of the Norwegian Sea, while to the south lies Lauvøyfjorden. The road has a width of 6.5 meters (21 ft) and a maximum gradient of eight percent. It consists of eight bridges and four resting places accommodated as viewpoints. Several tourist sites, including dining, fishing and scuba diving resorts, have been established on the islands. Along with the section from Vevang to Bud, the Atlantic Ocean Road has been designated one of eighteen National Tourist Routes.

Atlantic Ocean Road Facts

  • Driving along the Atlantic Road is like teetering on the edge on the sea. The road’s rollercoaster feel, curvy bridges and phenomenal views have made it a favorite of road trippers and motorcyclists.
  • The road is built on several small islands and skerries, which are connected by several causeways, viaducts and eight bridges—the most prominent being Storseisundet Bridge.
  • The construction started 1 August 1983. The opening of the road took place 7 July 1989.
  • It is a popular site to film automotive commercials, has been declared the world’s best road trip, and been awarded the title as “Norway’s Construction of the Century”
  • In 2009, the Atlantic Ocean Tunnel opened from Averøy to Kristiansund; combined, they have become a second fixed link between Kristiansund and Molde
  • The route was originally proposed as a railway line in the early 20th century, but this was ultimately abandoned. Serious planning of the road started in the 1970s, and construction started on 1 August 1983
  • During construction, the area was hit by twelve hurricanes. The road was opened on 7 July 1989, having cost 122 million Norwegian krone (NOK), of which 25 percent was financed with tolls and the rest from public grants. Source by Twisted Sifter