Teaching English in Korea

The key to happy and fruitful employment as a language instructor in Korea is to be employed by a reputable school. Some Canadian citizens have come to Korea under contract with promises of generous salaries, bonuses and other amenities, and many are quite satisfied with the experience. A minority, however, have found themselves in positions far different from those originally promised.

Canadian government offices are not permitted to become involved in any case, conduct an investigation, or act as lawyers or mediators in any personal, legal or contractual conflicts experienced by Canadian citizens. They cannot investigate, certify or vouch for prospective employers. It is up to each individual to evaluate any employment offer before signing a contract.

The Canadian Embassy in Seoul does not maintain a list of teaching institutes. If you are thinking of accepting a job as a teacher of English in Korea, you are advised to ask the institute concerned for the names and telephone numbers of current and former teachers so that you can contact them directly to ask about conditions there. Keep in mind that there is no shortage of teaching jobs in Korea; you can be selective in your choice.

Government help in Korea

Once again, please bear in mind that Canadian government offices are not permitted to become involved in any case, conduct an investigation, or act as lawyers or mediators in any personal, legal or contractual conflicts experienced by Canadian citizens. They cannot investigate, certify or vouch for prospective employers. It is up to each individual to ... Read more Government help in Korea

Adapting to Culutral Differences in Korea

There are many different types of people teaching English in Korea. Some are professionally trained with degrees in TESOL; some hold postgraduate degrees in other disciplines and are teaching in Korea because they want to experience another culture; some are teaching English while doing other work, such as research; some are teaching English while looking ... Read more Adapting to Culutral Differences in Korea

Health Insurance in Korea

In principle, foreign instructors are entitled to Korean medical insurance through their employer. You should clarify this when you accept an offer of employment. It is important that you know and understand the nature and scope of coverage, so be sure to ask your employer about the important details. Medical care in Korea is generally ... Read more Health Insurance in Korea

Income Taxes while Teaching in Korea

Income tax is another common cause of complaint. Most foreign employees are required to pay Korean income tax, which is generally withheld from an employee's salary and paid by the employer. The Korean income-tax rate is 5 to 10 percent. Article 20 of the Korean Tax Code states: "An individual who is a resident of a ... Read more Income Taxes while Teaching in Korea

Working Hours & Severance pay

Most institutes require foreign instructors to teach 5 to 6 hours a day, Monday through Friday, and some ask instructors to teach on Saturday mornings as well. University departments usually require instructors to teach 10 to 15 hours a week, and to participate in student activities and in the editing of school newspapers. Research institutes ... Read more Working Hours & Severance pay

Apartments for Teachers in Korea

Few contracts provide for housing in Seoul. This can be a serious problem, as housing in that city is among the most expensive in the world. If your institute does not provide housing, it should at least be able to help you find accommodation and negotiate the appropriate rent and utility payments. Housing options include: ... Read more Apartments for Teachers in Korea

ESL Teachers Contracts in Korea

Koreans see business less as a legally based interaction than a relationship. Consequently, there is a much weaker sense of law in Korean business relations than in international business. For many Koreans, a contract is part of the symbolism involved in beginning a relationship, and "beginning" is the important word. The contract thus is only ... Read more ESL Teachers Contracts in Korea

Work Visas & Permits for Teaching English in Korea

To work legally in Korea, you must obtain the appropriate employment visa. If you wish to work in Korea, you must obtain the visa outside the country. However, you can enter Korea on a tourist visa, obtain letters of sponsorship and apply for the visa in a nearby country (Japan or Hong Kong). As visa ... Read more Work Visas & Permits for Teaching English in Korea

Types of English Language Schools in Korea

Most English instructors teach in private foreign-language institutes (hakwons in Korean). There are, however, positions available in several other types of organizations: corporate in-house language programs; university foreign-language institutes; university departments; government/private research institutes; and public relations and advertising companies. What are Hakwons? Private language institutes are found all over Korea but the majority are located in ... Read more Types of English Language Schools in Korea

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